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Canary Islands Covid restrictions update.

Updated the 02nd of December. 

 

Following today’s meeting of the Canary Islands  Government reviewing Covid restriction levels, the following has been announced.

 

Fuerteventura is to move from Level 2 to Level 3. 

 

ICU capacity is at high risk for Fuerteventura today the 02nd of Dec. 

 

Lanzarote moves down from Level 2 to Level 1.

 

Lanzarote has had the lowest Covid rates of all the big four islands in the past week. 

 

The changes take effect at 00:00 next Monday. 

 

Despite rising covid levels stable hospital and ICU capacity have earned Tenerife and Gran Canaria at least another week at Level 1.

 

La Palma, La Gomera and El Hierro also remain at Level 1.

 

Restriction levels are reviewed every Thursday. 

 

See daily updates of the covid situation click here.

 

Islands current risk indicators click here. 

 

For the most up to date, tourist information follow Canaryislandstips on Twitter and Facebook. 

In the entire territory of the Autonomous Community, between November 23 and 29, 2,141 new cases of COVID-19 were reported, which represents an increase of around 26.2% in the daily average of new cases in relation to the previous week, in which 1,696 cases were registered.

 

The average 7-day AI rate in the Canary Islands as a whole and by islands increased by around 21.2%, so that, from a daily average of 81.2 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, it went to 98, 4 cases in this last week. The greatest rise is observed on the island of Fuerteventura, although in general, the increasing trend in the last week for this indicator continues. All the islands are at a medium risk level, except Fuerteventura, which is at a high-risk level, while La Gomera and El Hierro are at a low and very low-risk level.

 

The daily average AI rate at 14 days increases to a greater or lesser extent in all the islands and, therefore, in the Autonomous Community as a whole, and rises to high risk. Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote are at a high-risk level; Tenerife, La Gomera and La Palma are at medium risk and El Hierro is in controlled circulation.

 

The evolution of the accumulated incidences responds to the general relaxation in the maintenance of non-pharmacological preventive measures (mask, physical distance, ventilation, hand washing) despite the fact that their efficacy has been amply demonstrated. Therefore, the Ministry of Health insists on the need to maintain preventive measures to avoid risks of transmission of COVID-19: use of a mask perfectly covering the nose and mouth when indicated, especially indoors; respect for social distance; maintain cross ventilation and hand hygiene.

 

Healthcare indicators

Regarding the healthcare indicators, the daily average of conventional hospital beds occupied during the last week by COVID-19 patients increased by 22.7% compared to the previous week, with an average of 173 beds occupied, although the percentage of occupancy is at a low-risk level on the islands, except on La Palma and El Hierro, which are at very low risk.

 

The number of occupied ICU beds maintains the upward trend that began three weeks ago, with an average in the Autonomous Community as a whole of 35 occupied beds in the last week, an occupancy percentage of 7% and low risk. Most of the islands continue to have a very low-risk level in ICU bed occupancy, except Tenerife and Gran Canaria, which are at low risk, and Fuerteventura, which are at high risk.

 

The median age of all people hospitalized for COVID-19 in the last 14 days is 65.5 years.

 

Change in indicators for risk assessment

The report also details in the case of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, that both islands are at alert level 1 since on November 23 the Public Health Commission approved the document of Indicators for risk assessment and alert levels transmission of COVID, which modifies upwards the thresholds in the indicators of a block I, related to the spread of the virus in the community and gives greater prominence to block II of indicators, related to healthcare pressure.

 

In this way, although for the last 4 weeks both islands have experienced a constant and progressive increase in all the indicators of both blocks, especially in block I, they do not exceed the thresholds established for block II in that document. Therefore, although Gran Canaria and Tenerife are the islands that would be closest to a level increase, they do not yet meet the criteria for this and the data indicates that both may continue at alert level 1, although they point to a level increase in the next evaluation if the upward trend of the indicators continues.

Level 1 

  • Restriction on entering and leaving the island. No.
  • Restricted mobility at night. No
  • Gatherings of people who are not members of the same household. Maximum 12 people.
  • Hotels/bars and restaurants. Close at 03:00h. 
  • Sports facilities. Open. Maximum of 10 per group.
  • Collective transport. Running as usual.
  • Markets.  Open-air 100% and Inside 75% of capacity 
  • Local events. Yes.
  • Nightlife. Open-air 100% and Inside 75% of capacity.  Dancing is not permitted. 
  • Nightlife/Club activity is allowed until 4:00. 

Level 2.

  • Restriction on entering and leaving the island. No.
  • Restricted mobility at night. No.
  • Gatherings of people who are not members of the same household. Maximum 8 people.
  • Hotels bars and restaurants. Close at 02:00h
  • Sports facilities. Open—maximum of 6 per group.
  • Collective transport. 50% of capacity.
  • Markets. Yes. Open-air 75%, and Inside 50% of capacity.
  • Local events. Suspended.
  • Nightlife. Outdoor capacity 75%.  Indoor 50%.  Dancing is not permitted. 
  • Nightlife/Club activity is allowed until 4:00. 
  •  

Level 3.

  • Meetings of people from different households. Maximum of 6 people.
  • Hospitality bars and restaurants – outdoor terraces. Close at 01:00h 
  • Gym. 33% of maximum capacity. A prior appointment may be required.
  • Collective public transport (more than 9 seats). 33% of maximum capacity.
  • Cultural events (cinemas, concert halls). 55% of maximum capacity.
  • Nightlife 75% capacity outside and 40% inside.  Dancing is not permitted. 
  • Spas, jacuzzis and saunas. 33% of maximum capacity. A prior appointment may be required.
  • Outdoor swimming pools. 33% of maximum capacity.
  • Shops and businesses. 25% of maximum capacity.
  • Beaches. 50% of maximum capacity. A prior appointment may be required.
  • Nightlife/Club activity is allowed until 3:00. 

Level 4.

  • Meetings of people from different households. Maximum of 6 people.
  • Hospitality and restaurants –  Close at 01:00h.
  • Hospitality and restaurants – indoors.  maximum of 4 people per table. 
  • Gyms. 33% of maximum capacity. A prior appointment may be required. 
  • Collective public transport (more than 9 seats). 33% of maximum capacity.
  • Cultural events. 55% of maximum capacity. 
  • Nightlife establishments. 75% capacity outside and 25% inside.  Dancing is not permitted. 
  • Spas, jacuzzis and saunas. Closed.
  • Outdoor swimming pools. 33% of maximum capacity.
  • Shops and businesses. 25% of maximum capacity.
  • Beaches. 50% of maximum capacity. A prior appointment may be required.
  • Nightlife/Club activity is allowed until 1:00. 

26 thoughts on “Canary Islands Covid restrictions update.

  1. What are the chances of visitors from the UK being allowed in may? Does this mean no UK tourists until at least June?

  2. Does ‘New for level 3 and above, the retail sale of alcohol is prohibited from 8:00 p.m. and mass events’ mean hotels cannot serve guests after 8pm?

  3. Hi Pat,
    what paperwork is needed for travel to Malaga from Las P please?
    Passenger locator form? Vaccination Cert? Neg PCR test result? Antigen test result?
    Slán, Brian, P Rico

  4. Hi there. I have a holiday booked to feurteventura with jet 2. I can easily swap to Lanzarote. I was u aware of the levels when I booked. I’m travelling with kids and im pregnant so no alcohol sales late at night etc doesn’t bother me. Would you recommend swapping to Lanzarote. Due to travel 4 august. Thanks!

    1. Hi,

      It is so difficult to give that advice as things can change so quickly. The only thing I can say is Lanzarote is on level 1 and Fuerteventura is on Level 3. If there is going to be a curfew it will be on level 3 or higher but I don’t think 0030 curfews are going to bother you. Level 4 is the dreaded level and I think that is what people worry about. Lanzarote is further away from that. I am not saying Fuerteventura will go to 4 but level 1 is further away than level 3. I do honestly think the Govt wants to avoid level 4 if they can as it has a big economic hit. The govt has appealed to the supreme court to have a curfew for 3 and above. Its 50/50 if they will win or not.

  5. Hi, I just booked a holiday to Gran Canaria not realising the traffic light system’s were different. I’m wording what is the likelihood will change to better or worse in terms of restrictions by September? does the level of each island change much from week to week as I’m worried now!

    1. Hi. Levels are reviewed every Thursday by the government. They are reviewed by each island depending on their covid rates. I don’t know what Sept will be like, but it could also get better. Level 4 is the hardest level so far. Today at level 4, bars/restaurants can open to midnight. Shops and beaches are open. A lot of normal life goes on. Gran Canaria is currently on level 3.

  6. Currently in Tenerife on holiday, no bars are shutting at midnight and the staff have said that they are allowed to open till 2am/4am. It seems the only think being enforced is masks inside and that you have to stay sat at your table. Other than that, and it being fairly quiet, things are pretty much as normal.

    1. Thanks for the feedback JB. The official sites still saying midnight. There is a lot of confusion in the last few days between what the government wants and what the courts have said they can have. Level 3 and level 4 look much the same now.

  7. Hi. We are due to travel to Gran Canaria on 14th Aug. Are the restrictions bad? We enjoy live music and entertainment, is this still on? Many Thanks

  8. Hi there, I am die to go to tenerife on the 26th. Is it possible they can go into lockdown? Will we be able to get home if they do?

    Thanking you,
    Kate

    1. Hi Kate. I don’t see any full lockdown. There was a full lockdown, but that ended over a year ago. There are restrictions, but bars and restaurants, for example, are open until midnight, so it’s not too bad. Tenerife are on Level 4 restrictions. Covid rates have been falling in Tenerife since the start of the month. The 14-day covid rate was 615 on the 05th of August. It is 350 today, so it is heading in the right direction.

      1. Hi Pat thank you for your reply. So if we have the digital certificate we should be okay entering and leaving tenerife? I was worried that we may not be able to leave or would have to take tests etc to be able to leave

        1. Yes, the digital cert is good for entry. It depends on where you are returning to? If Ireland the Digital cert is also ok. I think the UK have some different rules.

  9. Going to Fuerteventura on 25th September from Scotland. Resort is Caletta, is it easy to arrange a PCR test there or is there some other way you would suggest.

    1. Airport at fuerteventura is cheapest , €29.17 , anti-gen test ,just do nose , €40 in Caleta at clinicmed, think that is full pcr test , I seem to think . Was there in July, fly out on 28th September. Hope this helps.

  10. Due to go to Tenerife on 18th October. Kids love spending all day in swimming pool but have heard you can only do morning or afternoon in pools. Is this true?

    1. Hi. I have not heard that unless individual hotels are doing their own things. Maybe contact where you are going to stay. Covid rates are falling currently and hopefully things will be more normal by then.

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